Geriatric Care Management

Care management is an important resource for families living with chronic illness. It is easy to become stressed out with the demands of the disease and with the red tape of the health care and social services network. Care managers need to have a basic understanding of the special needs of persons with chronic illness.

Care management skills are very helpful to families when there is a change in the person’s physical state or in awareness and understanding. Should this happen, a care manager can take another look at the person’s needs and at community supports. This may be necessary in the following instances:

  • when the person loses the ability to process information and help is needed to identify issues and provide follow-up with a course of action
  • when there is a change in the caregiver situation or support network that can easily become a crisis for the family as a whole
  • when there are fewer financial resources and the family is no longer able to pay for the resources they need
  • when safety issues arise that can put the ill person at greater risk

These issues and others require that care management continue as a long- term resource so that the care manager can step in when needed to provide more support.

To learn more about care management or find a care manager in your area, contact:

caring.com contributing writers, Maria Meyer and Paula Derr
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Filed under adult children of aging parents, Alzheimer's Disease, anxiety and the elderly, assessments, care giving, care planning, caregiving, clinical trial studies, dementia, Depression and the elderly, elder care raleigh nc, Geriatric Care Management, long term care planning, NC, Nursing Homes, nursing homes and assisted living, Raleigh, respite, senior care, Seniors and driving, sibling relationships, support groups, travel with seniors

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